Activist Kuki Gallmann Shot At Her Kenyan Ranch


Kuki Gallman, the Italian-born author and nature conservationist, was shot and injured in an ambush at her Kenyan ranch on Sunday morning.


The 73-year-old was surveying her Laikipia property when herders reportedly shot her in the hip and stomach. The herders were searching for pasture as Kenya suffers an intense drought, local police chief Ezekiel Chepkowny said, according to The Associated Press.


She was airlifted to a hospital in Nairobi and emerged from surgery in stable but critical condition, Gallman’s friends and family say.





Herders have said they need land from Gallman’s 139-square-mile conservancy to graze their livestock. Authorities believe some of them recently set fire to a retreat on Gallman’s property favored by her late son.


Fear not,” she wrote on her Facebook page after the alleged arson. “I am alive my spirit holds and I shall never give up.”


Kenyan citizen and author of bestseller I Dreamed of Africa, Gallman has been raising funds to rebuild the retreat and improve security on her land.


Sveva Gallman, Gallman’s daughter, told NPR earlier this month that while they’ve always allowed herders to graze their animals on the land, more herders from far away have showed up with thousands of cattle and increased tensions. She suspects that some of the livestock is owned by wealthy politicians.


Gallman hasn’t been the only target of violence in the Laikipia region. Herders are suspected of killing British rancher and safari company founder Tristan Voorspuy, who was shot to death while inspecting his lodges.


At least four police officers have been shot and injured during confrontations with herders in the region, Kenyan outlet Daily Nation reported. 


In February, Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta declared the country’s drought a national disaster. The Red Cross says 2.7 million people risk starvation

-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Russian Cyberspies Hacked Us For Two Years: Danish Defense Minister






A Russian cyberespionage group hacked into the emails of Danish Defense Ministry employees for two years, the country’s defense minister says.


In an interview on Sunday with the Danish paper Berlingske, Defense Minister Claus Hjort Frederiksen said the Russian hacker group ATP28 accessed department employees’ emails in 2015 and 2016. While no classified information was breached, Frederiksen characterized the hack as serious.


“It is linked to the intelligence services or central elements in the Russian government, and it is a constant battle to keep them away,” Frederiksen said in the interview.


U.S. Intelligence officials consider ATP28 ― also known as “Fancy Bear” ― to be linked to the Russian government, if not an outright agent of the Kremlin. Officials believe the same group hacked the Democratic National Committee and tried to interfere in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. 


Denmark, a NATO member, is the latest in a line of nations ― including the U.S., Ukraine, Georgia and Germany ― to accuse Russian hackers of cyberespionage. 


The Danish Defense Ministry confirmed to Reuters that Frederiksen was accurately quoted, but didn’t provide further details. The Kremlin didn’t respond to Reuters’ request for comment. 


Frederiksen had warned of the likelihood of a Russian cyberattack in January, after the Danish Defense Intelligence Service issued a 2016 national risk assessment report. Though the report did not specifically single out Russia, it indicated that Denmark was at high risk of cybercrime and a cyberattack by a “foreign government.”


The Russian government was likely to “get involved in our democratic processes” the same way it allegedly did in the U.S., Frederiksen told Berlingske earlier this year. 


Frederiksen said the defense ministry must strengthen its email and other cyberprotections in response to the hacking. 

-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

The best defense against an airline

Video evidence has emerged of an American Airlines incident in which an unidentified male passenger confronts a male flight attendant, warning him "You do that to me, and I'll knock you flat." The flight attendant rushes right back at the passenger and responds with "Hit me. Bring it on." This chest-bumping came shortly after that same flight attendant apparently had a confrontation with a female passenger holding a baby and yanked a baby stroller away from her.

12-Year-Old Drives 800 Miles Across Australia Before Police Stop Him

There’s nothing like the open road.


A 12-year-old boy attempting to drive across Australia by himself drove more than 800 miles before police arrested him.


Authorities from the Broken Hill Highway Patrol stopped the boy around 11 a.m. on Saturday, the New South Wales Police Force said in a statement.


“Checks revealed the driver to be a 12-year-old boy traveling from Kendall NSW on his way to Perth,” police said.


The boy was pulled over when highway patrol officers noticed his vehicle’s bumper dragging across the ground.



“Officers from Broken Hill Highway Patrol stopped a motor vehicle on the Barrier Highway due to defects which made the vehicle hazardous,” police said.


The child happened to be traveling during day two of “Operation Go Slow,” a driver safety campaign featuring heightened police presence on the roads in New South Wales.


The boy was arrested and taken to the Broken Hill Police Station.  


The road trip would be an ambitious one for even the most experienced traveler. It is unclear how he traveled such a great distance and refueled the car, all without being noticed, The Guardian noted.


Of course, this isn’t the first time a child has decided to take a road trip. Last year, two determined pre-schoolers in Washington state took the keys to their parents’ SUV with hopes of visiting their grandma, only to crash into another car.

-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

North Korea, With Characteristic Bluster, Threatens To Sink U.S. Aircraft Carrier

SEOUL, April 23 (Reuters) - North Korea said on Sunday it was ready to sink a U.S. aircraft carrier to demonstrate its military might, as two Japanese navy ships joined a U.S. carrier group for exercises in the western Pacific.


U.S. President Donald Trump ordered the USS Carl Vinson carrier strike group to sail to waters off the Korean peninsula in response to rising tension over the North’s nuclear and missile tests, and its threats to attack the United States and its Asian allies.


The United States has not specified where the carrier strike group is as it approaches the area. U.S. Vice President Mike Pence said on Saturday it would arrive “within days” but gave no other details.


North Korea remained defiant.


“Our revolutionary forces are combat-ready to sink a U.S. nuclear-powered aircraft carrier with a single strike,” the Rodong Sinmun, the newspaper of the North’s ruling Workers’ Party, said in a commentary.


The paper likened the aircraft carrier to a “gross animal” and said a strike on it would be “an actual example to show our military’s force.”


The commentary was carried on page three of the newspaper, after a two-page feature about leader Kim Jong Un inspecting a pig farm.


Speaking during a visit to Greece, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi said there were already enough shows of force and confrontation at present and appealed for calm.


“We need to issue peaceful and rational sounds,” Wang said, according to a statement issued by China’s Foreign Ministry.


Adding to the tensions, North Korea detained a Korean-American man in his fifties on Friday, bringing the total number of U.S. citizens held by Pyongyang to three.


The man, Tony Kim, had been in North Korea for a month teaching accounting at the Pyongyang University of Science and Technology (PUST), the institution’s chancellor Chan-Mo Park told Reuters. He was arrested at Pyongyang International Airport on his way out of the country.


North Korea will mark the 85th anniversary of the foundation of its Korean People’s Army on Tuesday.


It has in the past marked important anniversaries with tests of its weapons.


North Korea has conducted five nuclear tests, two of them last year, and is working to develop nuclear-tipped missiles that can reach the United States.


It has also carried out a series of ballistic missile tests in defiance of United Nations sanctions.


North Korea’s growing nuclear and missile threat is perhaps the most serious security challenge confronting Trump.


He has vowed to prevent the North from being able to hit the United States with a nuclear missile and has said all options are on the table, including a military strike. 



WORRY IN JAPAN


North Korea says its nuclear program is for self-defense and has warned the United States of a nuclear attack in response to any aggression. It has also threatened to lay waste to South Korea and Japan.


U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said on Friday North Korea’s recent statements were provocative but had proven to be hollow in the past and should not be trusted.


“We’ve all come to hear their words repeatedly; their word has not proven honest,” Mattis told a news conference in Tel Aviv, before the latest threat to the aircraft carrier.


Japan’s show of naval force reflects growing concern that North Korea could strike it with nuclear or chemical warheads.


Some Japanese ruling party lawmakers are urging Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to acquire strike weapons that could hit North Korean missile forces before any imminent attack.


Japan’s navy, which is mostly a destroyer fleet, is the second largest in Asia after China’s.


The two Japanese warships, the Samidare and Ashigara, left western Japan on Friday to join the Carl Vinson and will “practice a variety of tactics” with the U.S. strike group, the Japan Maritime Self Defence Force said in a statement.


The Japanese force did not specify where the exercises were taking place, but by Sunday the destroyers could have reached an area 2,500 km (1,500 miles) south of Japan, which would be east of the Philippines.


From there, it could take three days to reach waters off the Korean peninsula. Japan’s ships would accompany the Carl Vinson north at least into the East China Sea, a source with knowledge of the plan said.


U.S. and South Korean officials have been saying for weeks that the North could soon stage another nuclear test, something the United States, China and others have warned against.


South Korea has put its forces on heightened alert.


China, North Korea’s sole major ally, opposes Pyongyang’s weapons programs and has appealed for calm. The United States has called on China to do more to help defuse the tension.


Last Thursday, Trump praised Chinese efforts to rein in “the menace of North Korea,” after North Korean state media warned the United States of a “super-mighty pre-emptive strike.”


(Additional reporting by Tim Kelly in Tokyo and Ben Blanchard in Beijing; editing by Ralph Boulton and Jason Neely)




-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Hundreds Of Iraqis Flee Heavy Fighting In Mosul






MOSUL, Iraq, April 23 (Reuters) - Heavy two-way traffic of carts carrying children, clothes, and the elderly crowded the main Baghdad-Mosul road on Sunday as hundreds of Iraqis fled heavy fighting or made their way back to areas seized back from Islamic State.


Families paid no heed to the sound of heavy mortar, artillery and machine gun fire raging in the background as U.S.-trained Iraqi forces battled Islamic State some two km.(about a mile) away.


Some had walked miles to a government checkpoint where the men were placed in army trucks and sent for security screening to ensure no militant sleeper cells get out of the city. Women and children were put on busses and sent to camps housing hundreds of thousands, some displaced since the offensive to retake the Islamic State stronghold began in October.


“We left because of darkness, hunger, and death. There are bullets and air strikes. We were injured, our children were injured,” said Younnes Ahmed, who was fleeing al-Thaura district with his family, their clothes all piled on a cart. There was a deep bullet wound on his hand.


A group of young men further inside the city sat on the street as soldiers gave them back identification cards they had taken to conduct background checks before letting them go.



Most houses were reduced to rubble, either because of air strikes or Islamic State bombs. Cars were hollowed out.


“Islamic State blew up my house with TNT to shield against air strikes,” said Hossam Saleh who now lives in rubble because he has nowhere to escape to.


Others were walking back into the city, eager to reclaim their homes after their neighborhoods had been retaken from Islamic State by U.S.-backed security forces.


“We left because of the air strikes but have now returned. But we want the government to restore services like electricity and water and to allow us to drive instead of using carts,” said Mosaab Mohamed who was walking back into Mosul with his family.


Iraqi forces have taken much of Mosul from the militants who overran the city in June 2014. The military now controls the eastern districts and are making advances in the west.


Islamic State fighters, holding out in the Old City, are surrounded in the northwest and are using booby traps, sniper and mortar fire to defend themselves.


Three policemen were killed in a suicide attack south of Mosul. A group of about 10 assailants, including four suicide bombers, had tried to infiltrate a Federal Police helicopter base in Al-Areej, a police captain told Reuters.



WATER


Those who have returned say the government has been slow to restore services even to western districts that had been retaken a while ago.


“We are besieged in the Resala area. There are stray bullets from other areas where there is fighting; three children have died,” said Mohamed Sobhi.


“Water and aid cannot reach us. I call on the government to redistribute the people in areas like ours into other safer areas in Mosul.”


Hundreds of thousands of civilians are still trapped in western Mosul, where Iraqi forces are making slow progress against Islamic State in what is a labyrinth of narrow streets.


As of April 20, some 503,000 people have been displaced from Mosul, of whom 91,000 have returned, according to the U.N. refugee agency UNHCR. The U.N. migration agency, the IOM, puts the displaced figure at 334,518 people as of April 23.


Still, there were signs of a slow return to commerce on Sunday, with one man setting up a cigarette stand and a family selling candy bars and water on the Mosul-Baghdad road, and residents were eager to rebuild.


“We do not want anything from the government, we just want to be alllowed to help ourselves. If we can have letters allowing us to go other places we will get our own water, and transport it back,” said Omar Khaled as he carried his infant son back into the city.


(Reporting by Ahmed Aboulenein; editing by Ralph Boulton)

-- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

1 2 3 4 5 6 10